${site.data.firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt}
Serving our Friends & Neigors Sinc 1966 478-250-1574 888-2129

Macon GA Personal Injury Law Blog

Georgia woman dies in rear-end collision

A multi-vehicle traffic accident on the evening of Nov. 6 left one woman dead and another person injured in Dougherty County. A third man involved in the collision received a traffic citation and may face additional criminal charges related to the fatal crash as well.

According to information released by investigators with the Dougherty County Police, the three-car accident occurred at approximately 8:30 p.m. at the intersection of Liberty Expressway and Holly Drive in Albany. Witnesses claim the 43-year-old Mitchell County woman driving a black Volkswagen Beetle was stopped at a red light when her vehicle was rear-ended by a red van driven by a 72-year-old Montgomery County man. The force of the impact then caused the Volkswagen to strike another black vehicle in front of it driven by a 34-year-old Ocklocknee's Ford woman. Bystanders rushed to assist the victims, pulling the 34-year-old woman from her vehicle, but they found the 43-year-old woman already deceased inside her car.

Georgia car accident kills husband and wife

A married couple traveling south on Interstate 75 near Adairsville suffered fatal injuries after their vehicle was rear-ended on the highway. According to authorities, the Oct. 30 accident occurred around 9 p.m.

Reportedly, that is when a 2008 BMW struck the rear of the couple's 2004 Ford Explorer, causing the SUV to careen down an embankment adjacent to the roadway. Officials at the scene of the crash declared both the husband and the wife dead. The driver of the BMW, a 50-year-old man, was detained following the crash on suspicion of impaired driving. According to the Georgia State Patrol, multiple charges may be filed against the man.

Risks and preventative measures related to drunk driving

Drinking and driving is a serious problem in Georgia and the rest of the United States because on average one person dies every 51 minutes due to an alcohol-impaired driver. While nearly 30 people die because of these accidents a day, the financial consequences of drunk driving are large too. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, drunk driving crashes cost more than $59 billion a year when totaled.

Some people are more at risk for operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol than others. Twenty-nine percent of motorcyclists who died in car accidents in 2012 had a blood alcohol concentration of .08 percent or higher, which is above the legal limit. Almost half of these motorcyclists were 40 years old or older, and motorcycle drivers between the ages of 40 and 44 are most likely to drive while intoxicated. Regardless of BAC, younger drivers are more at risk for being involved in a drunk driving accident than older drivers. Additionally, one out of three drivers involved in fatal crashes who had a BAC of .08 percent or higher were between 21 and 24 years old.

Hours of service regulations

Some Georgia residents may be unaware that commercial motor vehicle drivers must comply with a set of federal regulations known as Hours of Service rules. This applies to, among others, truck drivers traveling in tractor-trailers that weigh at least 10,001 pounds or that transport enough hazardous material to require placards.

All transportation companies must ensure that their drivers are following Hours of Service rules. Pursuant to these regulations, drivers are limited to, per day, 11 hours of driving and 14 hours of work altogether. Moreover, drivers may not work more than 70 hours per week on average, and once this maximum is reached on any given week, the drivers must rest for at least 34 consecutive hours, within which must pass two nights. The Hours of Service rules also call for drivers to take a half-hour break within the first eight hours of each shift.

Fatal multi-vehicle crash caused by wrong-way driver, police say

The Georgia State Police report that on Oct. 9, a four-vehicle accident in Conyers claimed the life of one person, and two other individuals who were involved were hospitalized for unknown injuries. One of the injured victims, a deputy, was reportedly pursuing the wrong-way driver at the time of the crash.

According to the report, the chain-reaction collision transpired at the intersection of Old Covington Highway and Sigman Road in Rockdale County around 11:30 p.m. when a woman driving a Hyundai Santa Fe in the wrong direction on Sigman Road smashed into a black Kia. The force of the impact caused the Kia to crash into a pickup truck, at which point both cars and the truck collided with a fourth vehicle belonging to the deputy who had been chasing the wrong-way driver.

1 killed, 1 injured in Georgia accident

One person was killed and another was injured in an accident in Warner Robins on Oct. 8. The driver responsible for the crash ran a red light at what appears to be high speed, causing the fatal accident.

Police report that around 9:15 a.m., a 22-year-old Warner Robins woman was making left turn from Burns Drive onto Russell Parkway when her 2002 Mazda Tribute was hit by a 2000 Ford F250 pickup truck, driven by a 34-year-old Perry man, that had just ran a red light. The Mazda had the green light for the turn at the time of the accident. The skid marks from the Ford at the scene began before the stop line of the traffic light. The Mazda crashed into a barrier protecting some nearby gas pumps, and the driver's side seating area and the back of the car were crushed. The pickup truck stopped on the eastbound side of Russell Parkway, facing west.

Statistics relating to truck accidents

Georgia residents might be interested in figures released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration regarding crashes in 2012 that involved large trucks. Fatalities stemming from these accidents increased by 4 percent over the previous year, with 3,781 deaths in total, reportedly.

Among the 1,688 vehicles involved in fatal crashes in Georgia during that same year, 149 of them were large trucks, or about 9 percent. Research reveals that 81 percent of fatal accidents involving semi-trucks include multiple vehicles, whereas 58 percent of fatal crashes involving no semi-trucks are multiple-vehicle accidents.

4 Texas women killed in softball team bus crash

Four softball players from North Central Texas College lost their lives when the team bus was hit by an 18-wheeler in Oklahoma on Sept. 26. The team bus, carrying 15 players, was being driven home by the coach following a scrimmage against Bethany's Southern Nazarene University. The crash happened late in the evening approximately 60 miles north of the Gainesville campus on Interstate-35.

Three of the women reportedly died at the scene, and a fourth later succumbed to her injuries in a Sulphur, Oklahoma, hospital. Two other players remained in Norman Regional Hospital the following day, one in critical condition, while the coach and nine other players were treated and released.

Motorcyclist killed in Georgia by minivan driver

A motorcyclist is dead after an accident on Sept. 19 in Columbus. His Harley-Davidson was hit by a minivan driven by a Salem, Ala. woman. Both he and his wife were in the state to attend the Georgia HOG Rally. According to the coroner from Muscogee County, the man died at the Midtown Medical Center at about 10:19 a.m. An autopsy has been scheduled. The driver who hit the biker was taken into custody and charged with vehicular homicide and cited for a traffic light violation. She was released from the Muscogee County Jail after posting bond.

The accident occurred on Victory Drive near the Econo Lodge when the biker, who started entering the intersection, was hit by a 64-year-old minivan driver who did not stop at a red light while making a left turn. According to witnesses, the minivan dragged the motorcyclist for around 75 feet under the van's carriage. Another motorcyclist saw the woman on her cellphone moments following the accident, and authorities are checking to see if she was using the phone when the accident happened.

The hazard of using a cellphone while driving

While Georgia prohibits adults who are behind the wheel of a motor vehicle from a specific type of cellphone use, texting, many states have enacted bans on cellphone use altogether while driving. In large part, the reason that lawmakers in Georgia and other states enacted these bans is the troubling correlation between cellphone use while driving and traffic accidents resulting in death or injuries, as expounded by various statistics and studies.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, distracted driving can be a mortal mistake. Reportedly, distracted drivers caused 18 percent of deadly traffic accidents throughout the country in 2010. In this way, distracted driving was responsible for the deaths of 3,092 people in total. In that same year, 2010, crashes attributed to distracted driving caused 416,000 people to suffer injuries, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports.

FindLaw Network