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Macon GA Personal Injury Law Blog

Motorcycles and vehicle -to-vehicle communication

Georgia motorcycle enthusiasts might be interested to learn about a coming technology that has the potential to greatly reduce the number of both small-vehicle as well as motorcycle crashes. The technology, which is currently undergoing the final administrative steps for its release, allows vehicles to communicate safety data with one another, alerting drivers to the presence of other vehicles or slowing traffic.

While the vehicle-to-vehicle communication technology is currently under study for release as a technology for cars and light trucks, its potential to also reduce motorcycle crashes is promising. In a safety pilot study conducted by the Department of Transportation in 2012, nearly 3,000 cars and light trucks in Ann Arbor, Michigan, were fitted with the technology. The study demonstrated that the systems worked well across manufacturers.

Large truck accident statistics in the U.S.

Every year, large truck accidents happen on highways in Georgia and throughout the U.S. These accidents often result in catastrophic injuries or deaths. An accident may happen if a driver of a passenger vehicle fails to take extra caution when driving near a large truck or if certain circumstances cause the truck driver to lose control of the vehicle. Repercussions of large truck-related wrecks may be more severe in nature than consequences of a wreck between two passenger cars due to the large, heavy structure of trucks. Even minor errors made on the roadway could cause major damage to an individual who collides with a commercial vehicle.

A division of the U.S. Department of Transportation has indicated that large truck accidents may take place more frequently than people might realize. There were 333,000 traffic accidents that involved a commercial vehicle in 2012. That same year, large truck accidents resulted in 3,921 people killed and 104,000 people injured. Of these fatalities, 73 percent were people in other cars, 18 percent were people in large trucks and 10 percent were pedestrians and those outside of cars.

Texting while driving triples the distraction for drivers

Drivers in Georgia and the rest of the United States face the same roadway risks associated with distracted drivers. Mobile tablet or smart phone use by someone behind the wheel creates a serious distraction that has been linked to car accidents.

Data reviewed by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal facts about the hazards of driver distractions. From 2011 to 2012, the number of people injured in distracted driver accidents increased by 9 percent from 387,000 to 421,000. The year 2012 also saw 3,328 deaths in similar crashes. In 2011, distracted driving caused 17 percent of car accidents in which a person was injured.

The basics of whiplash, from causes to prevention

Whiplash occurs when the neck is thrust one way and then jerked violently or suddenly the other way. Although whiplash can occur in sports, at work or from falling, road users in Georgia might not realize that traffic collisions are the primary cause. In a whiplash, the head rises up from the spine, creating a sprain or strain at the bottom of the skull. A sprain occurs when the ligaments in the neck become torn, while a strain occurs when the tendons and muscles of the neck are overstretched. The facet joints and capsules in the neck appear to be the most susceptible. Although rare, whiplash could dislocate or fracture vertebrae.

Stiffness and pain at the bottom of the skull, in the back of the neck or at the front of the neck are the most commonly experienced symptoms. However, the stiffness and pain might extend through the shoulders, arms, upper chest or upper back. Headaches are also common, occurring in more than 66 percent of whiplash patients. These and other symptoms usually do not arise for two to 48 hours following the onset of the injury.

3 injured in Georgia collision

Three people were injured in a collision in Mitchell County on December 25. The driver of one of the vehicles involved in the crash was charged with driving under the influence in relation to the incident.

According to the Georgia State Patrol, the car accident occurred at about 12 p.m. at the intersection of GA 112 and GA 262 near the Grady-Mitchell County line. A vehicle driven by a 40-year-old woman, traveling south on GA 112, stopped to yield to oncoming traffic while attempting to make a left turn onto 262. Another vehicle, driven by a 27-year-old man traveling north on GA 112, crossed the center line and collided head-on with the woman's vehicle.

Tractor-trailer driver killed in Georgia collision

According to Dawson County Sheriff's Department officials, a collision involving a tractor-trailer and a car on Dec. 18 claimed the life of one person and injured three others. Reportedly, the collision occurred around 11:30 a.m. on Highway 53 near Dawsonville.

The truck's driver was a 36-year-old Oakwood man who was hauling a load of chicken feed. He allegedly failed to appropriately negotiate a curve in the highway. A Dawsonville woman was driving a Chevy Impala and the man's truck collided with her car. The force of the collision caused the truck to overturn, and the Impala apparently went through the truck's cab.

Common car accident injuries can be prevented

Many Georgia drivers become involved in car accidents. While some accidents are minor, others could result in serious injuries. However, there are certain ways that a driver or other vehicle occupants may reduce the risk of common accident injuries.

Common injuries that could leave a person temporarily or permanently disabled include head, neck and brain injuries. A person may suffer a face, head or brain injury if a collision causes the person's head to come into contact with a sharp or blunt object, such as a piece of glass from the windshield or the dashboard. These types of injuries can be prevented by properly installed front and side airbags. Additionally, people should try to wrap their arms around their head to form an emergency helmet.

1 dead, 2 injured after Georgia driver runs through stop sign

According to law enforcement officials with the Henry County Police, a Butts County man was killed and two others were seriously injured in a collision that occurred when a driver reportedly ran a stop sign. The fatal collision occurred on the night of Nov. 29 on Georgia 81. Officers did not say if any other factors like impairment contributed to the wreck.

A 19-year-old man was driving a 2002 Ford Focus on Jackson Lake Road when he approached the road's intersection with Ga. 81. He reportedly failed to stop at a stop sign when he arrived at the intersection. He then collided with a 2007 Ford Mustang driven by an 18-year-old man. The impact of the collision caused the death of the 19-year-old. He was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident by responding emergency personnel.

Georgia driver faces charges for DUI, homicide

A Calhoun woman has received an indictment after a May 23 car accident that allegedly involved drunk driving and killed a pedestrian. The Gordon County grand jury issued the indictment after a 50-year-old woman struck a 65-year-old woman in a residential neighborhood while the victim was at a mailbox.

According to the deceased's daughter, her mother, who was from Augusta, went to the mailbox at around 11:30 a.m. The woman was on the side of the road at the mailbox on Blackwood Place when a Dodge Neon SXT struck her. The Dodge arrived on Blackwood from Ga. Highway 53, and a Georgia State Patrol's incident report indicated that the vehicle was traveling at a fast speed. After the impact, the pedestrian sent her about 52 feet into the air.

Car accidents and collision avoidance technologies

Regardless of how good a Georgia driver is, he or she cannot control what other drivers do. Sudden changes by others can lead to dangerous situations that increase the risk of an accident. This is generally true even if the driver has time to anticipate what others are doing on the highway. However, there are technologies that may enable vehicles to take some of the guesswork out of driving. These technologies work by alerting the driver of changing conditions and may even help the car take action to stop by itself.

Automatic braking and other speed-limiting technologies may help drivers avoid rear-end collisions, while lane departure warning can help drivers avoid accidents while changing lanes. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, these technologies are not always standard in vehicles. In some cases, they are not even required to help a vehicle meet safety requirements.